BabelColor ®
Color Measurement and Analysis
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CT&A RGB vs RGB

compare and convert 

The RGB vs RGB tool. In the screenshot above, we compare the same RGB coordinates (157, 231, 199) in two RGB spaces, Adobe (1998), in Space #1 and sRGB, in Space #2. On either side of the window, you can select among 20 predefined RGB spaces plus a custom RGB space, as shown here for Space #2. In the chromaticity diagram, Space #1 is illustrated by a GREEN square while Space #2 is illustrated by an ORANGE square. While the RGB coordinates are the same, they do not represent the same color as we clearly see in the chromaticity diagram above, and also visually. You can obtain the coordinates for the visually equivalent color in sRGB by converting TO the sRGB space; this is shown on the screenshot on the bottom of this page, where the orange square covers the green square. We now see that the patches are of the same color and the color difference is zero as computed in CIEDE2000 (Note: in these screenshots the color difference is computed with the colors converted to D50, using a CIECAT02 CAT, but we could as well get the difference in D65). What the screenshot on the bottom means is that:      Adobe (1998) RGB (157, 231, 199) is the same color as      sRGB (112, 232, 199). In some cases it is not possible to find an exact match, and the nearest color is then found, in such a case, you will see a clipping indicator under the RGB labels of the destination space. In the other screenshot on the right we see that the red coordinate is clipped ( ! ) to zero. In these RGB vs RGB screenshots, the window has been extended to show additional patch layouts. In the bottom-left, we see larger patches presented side by side; you can select a gray, white or black background by just clicking on the patches. In the top-right, we see the patches on standard white and black backgrounds and on a background of the other color. In the bottom-right, we see text of each color on white, black and the other color backgrounds, the same color on background combinations used for the patches just above; the text content, size and style can be edited. The color-on-background combinations of the patches and text on the right of the window are used to compute a Contrast Ratio defined by the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG), a ratio helpful in analyzing the legibility of colored text. This ratio is discussed specifically on the next screenshot page. 
BabelColor ®

CT&A RGB vs RGB

compare and convert 

The RGB vs RGB tool. In the screenshot above, we compare the same RGB coordinates (157, 231, 199) in two RGB spaces, Adobe (1998), in Space #1 and sRGB, in Space #2. On either side of the window, you can select among 20 predefined RGB spaces plus a custom RGB space, as shown here for Space #2. In the chromaticity diagram, Space #1 is illustrated by a GREEN square while Space #2 is illustrated by an ORANGE square. While the RGB coordinates are the same, they do not represent the same color as we clearly see in the chromaticity diagram above, and also visually. You can obtain the coordinates for the visually equivalent color in sRGB by converting TO the sRGB space; this is shown on the screenshot on the bottom of this page, where the orange square covers the green square. We now see that the patches are of the same color and the color difference is zero as computed in CIEDE2000 (Note: in these screenshots the color difference is computed with the colors converted to D50, using a CIECAT02 CAT, but we could as well get the difference in D65). What the screenshot on the bottom means is that:      Adobe (1998) RGB (157, 231, 199) is the same color as      sRGB (112, 232, 199). In some cases it is not possible to find an exact match, and the nearest color is then found, in such a case, you will see a clipping indicator under the RGB labels of the destination space. In the other screenshot on the right we see that the red coordinate is clipped ( ! ) to zero. In these RGB vs RGB screenshots, the window has been extended to show additional patch layouts. In the bottom-left, we see larger patches presented side by side; you can select a gray, white or black background by just clicking on the patches. In the top-right, we see the patches on standard white and black backgrounds and on a background of the other color. In the bottom-right, we see text of each color on white, black and the other color backgrounds, the same color on background combinations used for the patches just above; the text content, size and style can be edited. The color-on-background combinations of the patches and text on the right of the window are used to compute a Contrast Ratio defined by the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG), a ratio helpful in analyzing the legibility of colored text. This ratio is discussed specifically on the next screenshot page. 
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